18 9 / 2014

mindblowingscience:

Scientists Twist Radio Beams to Send Data at 32 Gigabits Per Second, 30 Times Faster than 4G LTE

Scientists from three international universities have succeeded in twisting radio beams in order to transfer data at the speed of 32 gigabits per second, which is 30 times faster than 4G LTE wireless technology in use today.
The researchers, led by Alan Willner, an electrical engineering professor with the University of Southern California Viterbi School of Engineering, successfully demonstrated data transmission rates of 32 gigabits per second across 2.5m of free space in a basement laboratory.
"Not only is this a way to transmit multiple spatially collocated radio data streams through a single aperture, it is also one of the fastest data transmission via radio waves that has been demonstrated," said Willner.
The research, entitled “High-capacity millimetre-wave communications with orbital angular momentum multiplexing” is published in the latest issue of journal Nature Communications.
Of course this transmission speed is not as fast as what you can achieve if you twist light - Willner did this too, two years ago, and achieved data transmission speeds of 2.56 terabits per second - which is why the world is now moving towards fibre-optic internet networks. However, the scientists say radio is more reliable.
"The advantage of radio is that it uses wider, more robust beams. Wider beams are better able to cope with obstacles between the transmitter and the receiver, and radio is not as affected by atmospheric turbulence as optics," Willner said.
Millimetre waves occupy the 30GHz to 300GHz frequency bands.. They are found in the spectrum between microwaves, which take up the 1GHz to 30GHz bands, and infrared waves, which are sometimes known as extremely high frequency (EHF).
EHF can only be used over short distances such as a few kilometres due to high free space loss and atmospheric absorption.
However, more and more mobile operators are becoming interested in millimetre waves as they seek to create faster 4G LTE networks and beat congestion from too many users accessing the internet on their phones at one time. 
To achieve the high radio transmission speeds, the researchers passed each radio beam, which was carrying its own independent stream of data, through a “spiral phase plate” to twist it.
The radio beam turned into an orthogonal DNA-like helical shape which was untwisted at the other end of the room by the radio receiver.
"This technology could have very important applications in ultra-high-speed links for the wireless ‘backhaul’ that connects base stations of next-generation cellular systems," said Andy Molisch, a wireless systems researcher at USC Viterbi who co-designed and co-supervised the study with Willner.
Next, the researchers will attempt to extend the twisted radio beams’ transmission range and capabilities. The technology could have potential applications in data centres, where large bandwidth links between computer clusters are required.

mindblowingscience:

Scientists Twist Radio Beams to Send Data at 32 Gigabits Per Second, 30 Times Faster than 4G LTE

Scientists from three international universities have succeeded in twisting radio beams in order to transfer data at the speed of 32 gigabits per second, which is 30 times faster than 4G LTE wireless technology in use today.

The researchers, led by Alan Willner, an electrical engineering professor with the University of Southern California Viterbi School of Engineering, successfully demonstrated data transmission rates of 32 gigabits per second across 2.5m of free space in a basement laboratory.

"Not only is this a way to transmit multiple spatially collocated radio data streams through a single aperture, it is also one of the fastest data transmission via radio waves that has been demonstrated," said Willner.

The research, entitled “High-capacity millimetre-wave communications with orbital angular momentum multiplexing” is published in the latest issue of journal Nature Communications.

Of course this transmission speed is not as fast as what you can achieve if you twist light - Willner did this too, two years ago, and achieved data transmission speeds of 2.56 terabits per second - which is why the world is now moving towards fibre-optic internet networks. However, the scientists say radio is more reliable.

"The advantage of radio is that it uses wider, more robust beams. Wider beams are better able to cope with obstacles between the transmitter and the receiver, and radio is not as affected by atmospheric turbulence as optics," Willner said.

Millimetre waves occupy the 30GHz to 300GHz frequency bands.. They are found in the spectrum between microwaves, which take up the 1GHz to 30GHz bands, and infrared waves, which are sometimes known as extremely high frequency (EHF).

EHF can only be used over short distances such as a few kilometres due to high free space loss and atmospheric absorption.

However, more and more mobile operators are becoming interested in millimetre waves as they seek to create faster 4G LTE networks and beat congestion from too many users accessing the internet on their phones at one time. 

To achieve the high radio transmission speeds, the researchers passed each radio beam, which was carrying its own independent stream of data, through a “spiral phase plate” to twist it.

The radio beam turned into an orthogonal DNA-like helical shape which was untwisted at the other end of the room by the radio receiver.

"This technology could have very important applications in ultra-high-speed links for the wireless ‘backhaul’ that connects base stations of next-generation cellular systems," said Andy Molisch, a wireless systems researcher at USC Viterbi who co-designed and co-supervised the study with Willner.

Next, the researchers will attempt to extend the twisted radio beams’ transmission range and capabilities. The technology could have potential applications in data centres, where large bandwidth links between computer clusters are required.

(via verdantdeer)

17 9 / 2014

14 9 / 2014

sexyfaeriedream:

aviculor:

savvymavvy:

legitknits:

mcguirkthejerk:

kristinethequeen:

jimmysnowvakk:

This is what pisses me off about Tumblr. You all say you’re so accepting and you don’t want to offend anyone, but then thousands of people reblog something like this because Christians aren’t the minority. You wouldn’t want to offend a Muslim, and if this were offensive to them or another minority, there’d be so many comments about it. But everyone is completely fine with offending a non minority. “You’re not oppressed, you can’t talk!” You know what? I’m a Christian and this offends me and my faith, but nobody’s going to care about that because I’m not oppressed. Tumblr is hypocritical and that needs to stop.

Amen to the comment

Oh my precious lambs:

Examine why you are being offended. Because this is literally how a sunset works. There is not room for debate on this question. There is less room for debate on this than there is on just about any other thing. We are not reblogging because Christians aren’t the minority, dear ones. We are reblogging because after the debate a few days ago, creationists were given the opportunity to pose a question for non-creationists. One of these questions was:

"How can you explain a sunset if their is no god?" (sp.)

Questions, we assume, are posed so that someone might answer them. And yes, there is an answer of how exactly one can explain a sunset given the absence of a divine force. Now, you can certainly posit that God is the creator of all things and so all things came from him including the sun and light refraction and anthrax and kittens and famine and all that jazz.

But you don’t get to deny that THIS IS HOW A SUNSET WORKS, and of the necessary elements of this equation (Sun + Atmosphere + Angle = Sunset), God is not one of them. That’s because everything else is an observable phenomenon, and God is not. You can explain a sunset without God. You can go ahead and believe that God’s part of it all. That’s cool. Lots of people believe stuff like that, and I encourage you to delve into the ways that people make science and their faith jive. But if you are offended by being shown the basic scientific principals behind a sunset, you must be offended by damn near everything. And that seems exhausting. 

In short:

People getting butthurt over science, fucking love it.

"Stop teaching science, it offends me" 

Wheeeeeeeee

Okay, but, I don’t think she literally means “How does a sunset work”. I think she means, “If there isn’t a God, then how am I having these feelings of insignificance and awe?”

Science tells us how and why in a very dry sense but it doesn’t tell us why our emotions respond to everyday occurrences. (Not to mention that sunsets look different almost every day due to atmospheric fluctuations indeterminable by the layman.)

And not to say that either of those means there is or isn’t some kind of God! but goddamn this is literally the least harm anyone’s faith could do so let’s please stop shitting on this woman for having emotions she doesn’t understand and would like to shunt off to a “higher power”

14 9 / 2014

orangeis:

trashybooksforladies:

Meanwhile, Larry actor Jason Biggs and George “Pornstache” Mendez actor Pablo Schrieber will not appear in Season 3.
 

image

 

image

(via aparadoxinflux)

14 9 / 2014

This is probably for boats, not swimmers, but I still kinda wonder how far this ladder extends.

This is probably for boats, not swimmers, but I still kinda wonder how far this ladder extends.

14 9 / 2014

14 9 / 2014

Water the same color as the sky. Not even a lil filter.

Water the same color as the sky. Not even a lil filter.

14 9 / 2014

Yo #Chicago what is the story behind these creepy fountains

Yo #Chicago what is the story behind these creepy fountains

13 9 / 2014

unhistorical:

…the Saints are displayed in a cathedral in Eastern Germany close to the Czech border and were acquired in the 17th century when there was a big trade in relics. They are said to be the remains of Martyred saints that were stored in the catacombs of Rome before being removed and traded. They were reassembled and dressed in their fine regalia and displayed in ornate cabinets.

Toby de Silva

(via remierk)